Home » K-12 Audiences » The College STAR Student Support Network Virtual Conference & Workshop » 2021 Student Support Network Virtual Conference Schedule » High School vs. College: Mini Sessions » Neurodiversity & Self-Advocacy with Connie Syharat

Neurodiversity & Self-Advocacy with Connie Syharat

In this session, participants will learn about how a strengths-based approach to neurodiversity (cognitive variations and learning differences) can help students to leverage their own unique strengths for success in college.

Zoom Link

https://collegestar.zoom.us/j/83746084354?pwd=V1FzS1Qwa2N2b01Gcm01UWZROE5kUT09
Meeting/Webinar ID: 837 4608 4354
Passcode: cs2021

Presentation ToolKit resources

Participants will receive presentation slides and a PDF with a short strengths-based activity workbook designed for incoming college students. These resources are created as part of NSF grant #1920761.

About the Presenters

Connie Syharat

Connie Syharat is a Research Assistant at the University of Connecticut as a part of the NSF Revolutionizing Engineering Departments (NSF-RED) project, “Beyond Accommodation: Leveraging Neurodiversity for Engineering Innovation.” In her time at the University of Connecticut she has also worked as a Research Assistant for NSF CAREER project “Promoting Engineering Innovation Through Increased Neurodiversity by Encouraging the Participation of Students with ADHD” and has served as Program Assistant for the related summer program for middle school students with ADHD. Prior to joining the University of Connecticut, she spent eight years as a K-12 teacher in Connecticut public schools, where she maintained a focus on providing a varied learning environment and differentiated instruction for all types of learners. She received her Master of Arts in Modern Languages from Central Connecticut State University in 2011. She earned her Bachelor of Arts in Hispanic Studies and her teaching certificate from Connecticut College in 2001. She is currently pursuing a doctoral degree in Curriculum and Instruction at UConn’s Neag School of Education.